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Showing posts from February, 2017

Trump’s Speech to Congress Was a Peter Thiel Fever Dream

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Maybe the future—at least a populist, scant-on-details version—is finally rubbing off on the president. The post Trump's Speech to Congress Was a Peter Thiel Fever Dream appeared first on WIRED.

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Trump the Divider Takes a Stab at Unity

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A totally completely normal speech provides a new president's most surreal hour The post Trump the Divider Takes a Stab at Unity appeared first on WIRED.

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New target for Parkinson's disease identified by researchers

Investigators have discovered a novel link between a protein called SV2C and Parkinson's disease (PD). Prior work had suggested that the SV2C gene was associated with the curious ability of cigarette smoking to reduce PD risk.

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Rare proteins collapse earlier

Some organisms are able to survive in hot springs, while others can only live at mild temperatures because their proteins aren't able to withstand such extreme heat. Researchers investigated these differences and showed that often only a few key proteins determine the life and heat-induced death of a cell.

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Two migration proteins boost predictive value of pancreatic cancer biomarker

Adding two blood-borne proteins associated with cancer cell migration increases the predictive ability of the current biomarker for pancreatic cancer to detect early stage disease, a research team reports.

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From heroin addiction to alcohol-related problems

Methadone programs and long-term therapy using other opioids evidently work. People addicted to heroin consume less heroin, cocaine and even alcohol at the beginning of the treatment. As a long-term study reveals, however, the alcohol consumption among these patients has increased considerably since the 1990s.

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Study finds new link between childhood abuse and adolescent misbehavior

An important learning process is impaired in adolescents who were abused as children, a researcher has found, and this impairment contributes to misbehavior patterns later in life. A new article details the connection between impaired associative learning capacities and instances of early childhood abuse.

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Nonsurgical treatment can correct congenital ear malformations in infants

For infants with congenital malformations of the ear, a treatment system called EarWell can gently reshape the ear, avoiding the pain and cost of later surgery, reports a study.

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Google Takes on Cable With ‘YouTube TV’—40 Channels for $35

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YouTube TV—the much-anticipated TV streaming service from the video company—is official. It's $35 a month with 40+ channels, cloud DVR, and AI-powered search. The post Google Takes on Cable With 'YouTube TV'—40 Channels for $35 appeared first on WIRED.

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A better way to measure the stiffness of cancer cells

Biomedical engineers have discovered a way to detect signs of cancer on a cell-by-cell basis using two lasers and a camera. An increase in cell stiffness is an indicator of cancerous tissue, but current technology cannot gauge cells individually. In a study, researchers describe a technique for assessing an individual cell's stiffness using patterns that appear within its internal structure.

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Liver tumor growth in mice slowed with new chemo-immunotherapy treatment

Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common form of liver cancer, but treatment options are limited and many patients are diagnosed in late stages when the disease can't be treated. Now, researchers have developed a new treatment that combines chemotherapy and immunotherapy to significantly slow tumor growth in mice. The researchers believe that with more research, the strategy could be translated to benefit patients with the disease.

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Researchers discover new combination therapy strategy for brain, blood cancers

A new potential strategy to personalize therapy for brain and blood cancers has now been discovered by researchers.

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Transgender and gender-fluid teens left with few safe harbors

Transgender and gender-fluid teens, particularly those born male, face up to three times more mental and physical abuse at school and at home than their gender-conforming peers, according to a new study.

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Did seaweed make us who we are today?

Millions of years ago something happened, allowing early Homo sapiens to branch out from the primitive hominoid family tree. Was this crucial turn in human evolution partly driven by seaweed and its particular content of essential nutrients?

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Happy notes, happy memories

Happy memories spring to mind much faster than sad, scary or peaceful ones. Moreover, if you listen to happy or peaceful music, you recall positive memories, whereas if you listen to emotionally scary or sad music, you recall largely negative memories from your past, researchers have found.

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More mosquito species than previously thought may transmit Zika

Zika virus could be transmitted by more mosquito species than those currently known, according to a new predictive model created by ecologists.

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New approach to treating Alzheimer's disease

Researchers have introduced a new approach to treat Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's disease is the sixth leading cause of death among in older adults. The exact causes of Alzheimer's disease are still unknown, but several factors are presumed to be causative agents. Among these, the aggregation of amyloid-? peptide has been implicated as a contributor to the formation of neuritic plaques, which are pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease.

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Study clarifies risky decision making during a heart attack

In a recent study to determine why some individuals who experience symptoms for acute coronary syndrome decide to seek medical attention more quickly than others, a researcher has identified numeracy -- the ability to understand and apply numerical concepts as the primary decision delay risk factor for individuals experiencing the medical condition. Cardiovascular disease, which includes conditions such as acute coronary syndrome, is the number one killer worldwide responsible for about one in three deaths.

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The Amazon S3 Outage Is What Happens When One Site Hosts Too Much of the Internet

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Corporate consolidation in tech has implications for competition—but it also affects the resilience of the internet itself. The post The Amazon S3 Outage Is What Happens When One Site Hosts Too Much of the Internet appeared first on WIRED.

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Bro. BRO! Travis Kalanick Is Totally Sorry.

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This totally-not-made-up apology letter proves he's really trying. The post Bro. BRO! Travis Kalanick Is Totally Sorry. appeared first on WIRED.

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February’s Best Gear: New Wireless Headphones and Fancy PCs

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From the Microsoft Surface Studio and Beats headphones to Android Wear watches and new Samsung Chromebooks, these are the coolest gadgets we saw this month. The post February's Best Gear: New Wireless Headphones and Fancy PCs appeared first on WIRED.

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Watch Shell’s 1991 Video Warning of Catastrophic Climate Change

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A public information film unseen for years shows Shell had clear grasp of global warming 26 years ago but has not acted accordingly since, say critics. The post Watch Shell's 1991 Video Warning of Catastrophic Climate Change appeared first on WIRED.

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Facebook to Telcos: Forget Hardware Empires—Let’s All Share

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The social media giant hopes to catalyze a broader market that will mean more internet for more people everywhere. The post Facebook to Telcos: Forget Hardware Empires—Let's All Share appeared first on WIRED.

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Common bacterium may help control disease-bearing mosquitoes

Genes from a common bacterium can be harnessed to sterilize male insects, a tool that can potentially control populations of both disease-bearing mosquitoes and agricultural pests, researchers report.

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Review: 2017 BMW 5 Series

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The once supreme sporty sedan returns to its roots, with a touch of luxury. The post Review: 2017 BMW 5 Series appeared first on WIRED.

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Statins do not benefit patients with lung cancer, new study shows

Cholesterol-lowering drugs used alongside chemotherapy have no effect on treatment outcomes for lung cancer patients, according to a new study.

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Pacemaker function may be impacted by electric appliances; tools

Electric and magnetic fields generated from everyday household appliances, electrical tools and more, used in very close proximity to the body, can interfere with the ability of pacemakers to regulate patients' heartbeats. Dedicated device programming, e.g. sensitivity level, is an effective measure to reduce the individual risk of interference.

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Care by physicians, non-physician clinicians does not differ in community health centers

A new study examining patient health outcomes in community health centers found that nurse practitioners and physician assistants delivered care that was equivalent to care delivered by physicians.

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World-first genetic clues point to risk of blindness

Scientists have discovered the first evidence of genes that cause Macular Telangiectasia type 2 (MacTel), a degenerative eye disease which leads to blindness and is currently incurable and untreatable. The team's findings established five key regions -- or loci -- in the genome most likely to influence a person's risk of developing MacTel. The finding will enable researchers to better understand the disease and look for ways to prevent or stop its progression.

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After 3 Years, Why Gmail’s End-to-End Encryption Is Still Vapor

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Is the effort to end-to-end encrypt Gmail dead, or just a lot harder than it looks? The post After 3 Years, Why Gmail’s End-to-End Encryption Is Still Vapor appeared first on WIRED.

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Dad Leaving Embarrassing Comments on Your Feeds? Let Him

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But maybe ask him—gently—to tone it down a bit. The post Dad Leaving Embarrassing Comments on Your Feeds? Let Him appeared first on WIRED.

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Faulty genomic pathway linked to schizophrenia developing in utero, study finds

The skin cells of four adults with schizophrenia have provided an unprecedented 'window' into how the disease began while they were still in the womb, according to a recent paper.

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A sustained and controllable insulin release system

Researchers have developed an insulin release system with sustained and controllable delivery. The system combines two original technologies, SPRA and PPRX, which provide complimentary benefits for insulin delivery.

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New technology offers fast peptide synthesis

Researchers have designed a machine that can rapidly produce large quantities of customized peptides. This technology could help researchers rapidly generate new peptide drugs to test on diseases including cancer, diabetes, and bacterial infections.

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A Murder Case Tests Alexa’s Devotion to Your Privacy

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Opinion: An Arkansas legal case is testing whether Amazon can be forced to share information collected by Alexa with law enforcement. The post A Murder Case Tests Alexa's Devotion to Your Privacy appeared first on WIRED.

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Ski helmets lessens severity of injuries, research finds

New research focused on helmet safety and injury prevention among young skiers and snowboarders. The research found that children who wear a helmet while skiing or snowboarding sustain less severe head injuries and lower overall injury severity, compared to children who do not wear a helmet.

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Mammography trends show improved cancer detection, more biopsies

The shift from film to digital technology appears to have improved cancer detection rates for diagnostic mammography, but also has increased the abnormal interpretation rate, which may lead to more women undergoing biopsies for benign conditions, according to a new study.

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Drug combination defeats dengue, Ebola in mice, study finds

A combination of two cancer drugs inhibited both dengue and Ebola virus infections in mice in a study, despite the fact that these two viruses are vastly different from each other.

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Inactivity, excess weight linked to hard-to-treat heart failures

Lack of exercise and excessive weight are strongly associated with a type of heart failure that has a particularly poor prognosis, researchers determined in an analysis of data from three large studies.

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A (Kinda) Joint Bank Account for More-Than-Venmo-Serious Couples

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Not ready to tie the financial knot but hate getting your partner back for every taco? Simple's new feature lets you share just some of your money. The post A (Kinda) Joint Bank Account for More-Than-Venmo-Serious Couples appeared first on WIRED.

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Matching up fruit flies, mushroom toxins and human health

Some fruit flies build up tolerance to the toxin alpha-amanitin; the genetic mechanisms behind this adaptation link to an important metabolic pathway. Scientists have now used genome-wide association mapping to draw the connections for 180 fruit fly lines.

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Inside the Bizarre, Euro-Themed Towns of Shanghai

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You can visit Spain, Italy, and even Canda without ever leaving China. The post Inside the Bizarre, Euro-Themed Towns of Shanghai appeared first on WIRED.

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The Government’s Green Energy Incubator Fights for Survival in the Age of Trump

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This week, ARPA-E is showing off far-out ways to cool, heat, convert, conserve, and invent energy—all of which could be on the chopping block. The post The Government's Green Energy Incubator Fights for Survival in the Age of Trump appeared first on WIRED.

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The Tricky Art of Podcast Ads Is About to Get Even Trickier

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Is there an ethical issue with raving about Blue Apron? What if your podcast is about food startups? The post The Tricky Art of Podcast Ads Is About to Get Even Trickier appeared first on WIRED.

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Is Trump Hate-Tweeting You? Find Out if It’s Really a Crisis

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Big brands studiously seek to avoid politics, but few seem nimble enough to escape the presidential vortex. The post Is Trump Hate-Tweeting You? Find Out if It's Really a Crisis appeared first on WIRED.

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Google’s Robocar Lawsuit Could Kill Uber’s Future and Send Execs to Prison

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Financial penalties could cross the billion mark, and execs could spend years behind bars. The post Google's Robocar Lawsuit Could Kill Uber's Future and Send Execs to Prison appeared first on WIRED.

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The Supreme Court Could Soon Decide if You Have a Right to Facebook

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A registered sex offender argues that North Carolina's law keeping him off Facebook and other sites violates his First Amendment rights. The post The Supreme Court Could Soon Decide if You Have a Right to Facebook appeared first on WIRED.

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This Brilliant Plan Could Stop Drone Terrorism. Too Bad It’s Illegal

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Black Sage Technologies' track-and-jam system guards against airborne attacks on sporting events and other large-crowd gatherings. Just one hitch: US law. The post This Brilliant Plan Could Stop Drone Terrorism. Too Bad It’s Illegal appeared first on WIRED.

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A Fascinating Glimpse at How We’ll All Carpool in 2027

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Ideo reimagined the carpooling experience for 10 years in the future. The post A Fascinating Glimpse at How We’ll All Carpool in 2027 appeared first on WIRED.

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Taking aim at a key malaria molecule

A team of biological engineers has developed a method to measure levels of heme, a critical iron-containing molecule, inside the parasite that causes malaria. This could eventually help scientists develop better drugs to combat the disease.

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Limiting lung cancer's spread, growth in the brain

Researchers analyzed RNA from patients with disease that was limited to the lungs as well as cancers that had spread.

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Stem cells fiercely abide by innate developmental timing, study shows

A regenerative biology team is studying whether stem cell differentiation rates can be accelerated in the lab and made available to patients faster.

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Doctors should discuss herbal medication use with heart disease patients

Physicians should be well-versed in the herbal medications heart disease patients may take to be able to effectively discuss their clinical implications, potential benefits and side effects—despite a lack of scientific evidence to support their use, according to a review paper.

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New tool for combating mosquito-borne disease: Insect parasite genes

Discovery of the genes the insect parasite Wolbachia uses to control its hosts' reproduction provides a powerful new tool for enhancing biological control efforts for mosquito-borne diseases like dengue, Zika and malaria.

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Changes in RNA splicing: A new mechanism for genetic risk in schizophrenia

New research has identified sections of DNA associated with altered regulation of gene expression underlying schizophrenia. The implicated loci contribute to schizophrenia risk by affecting alternative splicing, part of the process that translates the same DNA code into multiple different proteins.

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Study reveals ways powerful 'master gene' regulates physical differences between sexes

The master gene that regulates differences between males and females plays a complex role in matching the right physical trait to the right sex, scientists have found. The research reveals new details about the behavior of the gene called 'doublesex,' or dsx.

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Harry Potter Finally Wins an Oscar by Going Back in Time

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It's about costumes. Period. The post Harry Potter Finally Wins an Oscar by Going Back in Time appeared first on WIRED.

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SpaceX Plans to Launch Humans Around the Moon in 2018

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The mission will use two of SpaceX's long-awaited technologies: a crew-rated capsule, the Crew Dragon, and the high-powered Falcon Heavy rocket. The post SpaceX Plans to Launch Humans Around the Moon in 2018 appeared first on WIRED.

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Living with children may mean less sleep for women, but not for men

New research backs up what many women already know: They're sleep deprived. Unlike men, a good night's sleep for women is affected by having children in the house, according to a preliminary study.

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Samsung Gear Finally Gets a Controller for Awesomer VR

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Designed by Samsung and Oculus, it touches and swipes and clicks and shoots. The post Samsung Gear Finally Gets a Controller for Awesomer VR appeared first on WIRED.

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Preserving vision for astronauts

As NASA prepares for its journey to Mars, one researcher is investigating why so many astronauts suffer from poorer vision after they return to Earth.

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New study tests potential treatment to combat Gulf War Illness

An estimated 25 percent of the 700,000 troops who engaged in the fierce battles of Operation Desert Storm and related Gulf War combat during 1990-91 are fighting a different, but relentless foe: Gulf War illness. A new study tests potential treatment to combat Gulf War illness.

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Woodstoves are good for the soul, bad for the heart

The risk of acute myocardial infarction for the elderly living in and around small cities is increased by air pollution caused by biomass burning from woodstoves.

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Molecular 'on switch' could point to treatments for pediatric brain tumor

Massachusetts General Hospital researchers have identified a mechanism that controls the expression of genes regulating the growth of the most aggressive form of medulloblastoma, the most common pediatric brain tumor.

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The Joyful Overkill of Sony’s Xperia XZ Premium Smartphone

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Sony's new flagship may not be for you, but at least they went for it. The post The Joyful Overkill of Sony’s Xperia XZ Premium Smartphone appeared first on WIRED.

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New standards for better water quality in Europe

The European Water Framework Directive (WFD) is due to be revised by 2019. The necessary work process is already in full swing and scientific research is providing important input. In a recent study, an international team of researchers formulated recommendations designed to improve the monitoring, assessment and management of pollutants.

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Research could lead to better vaccines and new antivirals

Scientists have identified a new regulator of the innate immune response—the immediate, natural immune response to foreign invaders. The study suggests that therapeutics that modulate the regulator—an immune checkpoint—may represent the next generation of antiviral drugs, vaccine adjuvants, cancer immunotherapies, and treatments for autoimmune disease.

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Genetic variant of p53 gene linked to breast cancer risk in premenopausal African American women

Scientists have found a significant association between a rare genetic variant of the p53 gene present in African American women and their risk of developing breast cancer in premenopausal age.

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Sponge bacterium found to encapsulate arsenic drawn from environment

A new study sheds light on a unique biological model of arsenic detoxification. According to the new research, the Entotheonella bacterium that inhabits the Theonella swinhoei sponge is one of the only known cases of a bacterium protecting its host from metal poisoning.

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Lack of oxygen, not excessive stimulation, cause for half of seizure-related brain damage in epilepsy

Neuronal degeneration is the most severe long-term consequence of repetitive seizures in patients with epilepsy, which until now was thought to be primarily caused by excitotoxicity, or over-stimulation of the neurons. New findings indicate hypoxia, or lack of oxygen, due to abnormal blood flow may be to blame for as much as half the neuronal death caused by the condition.

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Molecule stops fatal pediatric brain tumor

Scientists have found a molecule that stops the growth of an aggressive pediatric brain tumor. The tumor is always fatal and primarily strikes children under 10 years old.

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Research explores lasting effects of early preventive dental care in Medicaid-enrolled children

Children receiving early preventive dental care from a dentist had more frequent tooth decay-related treatment, a higher rate of visits and higher annual dental expenditures, a new study concludes.

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Walking Dead Recap Season 7, Episode 11: The Perks of Being the Vikings of the Zombie Apocalypse

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Survival, as you may have noticed, demands a certain degree of moral flexibility. The post Walking Dead Recap Season 7, Episode 11: The Perks of Being the Vikings of the Zombie Apocalypse appeared first on WIRED.

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