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Showing posts from May, 2017

Young adult substance abuse down 42 percent among PROSPER program participants

Children who participated in the PROSPER (PROmoting School-community-university Partnerships to Enhance Resilience) program over seven years ago showed lower rates of substance abuse after high school graduation, according to a new study.

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Building better brains: A bioengineered upgrade for organoids

Scientists, for the first time, have combined organoids with bioengineering. Using small microfilaments, they show improved tissue architecture that mimics human brain development more accurately and allows more targeted studies of brain development and its malfunctions.

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Progress reported in global fight against diarrheal disease cryptosporidiosis

Infectious disease scientists have reported the discovery and early validation of a drug candidate for treating cryptosporidiosis, a diarrheal disease which is a major cause of child mortality in lower-income countries. Currently there are no vaccines or effective treatments.

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Ditching the Paris Agreement Risks the Economy Even As It Harms the Planet

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Bad deal or not, the Paris climate agreement is already reshaping the world's economy. The post Ditching the Paris Agreement Risks the Economy Even As It Harms the Planet appeared first on WIRED.

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Nest’s New Security Cam Keeps a Sharp Eye on Your Smart Home

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There's no possible way Google is using the data it collects. None. The post Nest's New Security Cam Keeps a Sharp Eye on Your Smart Home appeared first on WIRED.

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New tech promises easier cervical cancer screening

Researchers have developed a handheld device for cervical cancer screening that promises to do away with uncomfortable speculums and high-cost colposcopes. If widely adopted, women might even self-screen, transforming screening and cure rates in low-income regions where cervical cancer is most prevalent.

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Lower targets for systolic blood pressure suggested by study

Reducing target systolic blood pressure below current recommendations significantly reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease and preventable death, research concludes.

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Possible correlation shown between the partial meltdown at TMI and thyroid cancers

For the first time, scientists have shown a possible correlation between the partial meltdown of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Generating Station and thyroid cancers in the counties surrounding the plant.

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Metabolic enzyme fuels molecular machinery of memory

Researchers have discovered, in the mouse brain, that a key metabolic enzyme works directly within the nucleus of neurons to turn genes on or off when new memories are being established.

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Half of adults with anxiety or depression report chronic pain

In a survey of adults with anxiety or a mood disorder like depression or bipolar disorder, about half reported experiencing chronic pain, according to researchers.

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Visual recognition memory impaired after multiple exposures to anesthesia during infancy

Repeated exposure to a common anesthesia drug early in life results in visual recognition memory impairment, which emerges after the first year of life and may persist long-term, according to a study.

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Inside Google’s Global Campaign to Shut Down Phishing

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It's not easy keeping billions of devices safe from phishing attacks. Here's how Google pulls it off. The post Inside Google's Global Campaign to Shut Down Phishing appeared first on WIRED.

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It’s Not Just You. TV Has Hit Peak WTF

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'Twin Peaks: The Return' and 'American Gods' are immersive head-scratchers that deny explanations and defy expectations. Being befuddled has never been more fun. The post It's Not Just You. TV Has Hit Peak WTF appeared first on WIRED.

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Small molecule prevents blood clots without increasing bleeding risk

It may be possible to disrupt harmful blood clots in people at risk for heart attack or stroke without increasing their risk of bleeding, according to a new study.

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Game changing strategy for pain relief developed

Researchers have developed a new drug delivery strategy able to block pain within the nerve cells, in what could be a major development of an immediate and long lasting treatment for pain.

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'Harder, better, faster, stronger': Tethered soft exosuit reduces metabolic cost of running

What if running the 26.2 miles of a marathon only felt like running 24.9 miles, or if you could improve your average running pace from 9:14 minutes/mile to 8:49 minutes/mile without weeks of training? Researchers have demonstrated that a tethered soft exosuit can reduce the metabolic cost of running on a treadmill by 5.4% compared to not wearing the exosuit, bringing those dreams of high performance closer to reality.

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Making prosthetic limbs feel more natural

A new surgical technique could allow prosthetic limbs to feel much more like natural limbs. Through coordination of the patient's prosthetic limb, existing nerves, and an artificial muscle graft, amputees would be able to sense where their limbs are in space and to feel how much force is being applied to them.

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Lingering risk of suicide after discharge from psychiatric facilities

A study that synthesized more than 50 years of research into suicide rates for patients after discharge from psychiatric facilities suggests the immediate period after discharge was a time of marked risk and that the risk remained high years after discharge, according to a new article.

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Brain's immune cells linked to Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, schizophrenia

Scientists conducted a vast microglia survey, revealing links to neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric illnesses.

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Wearable system helps visually impaired users navigate

A new system has been developed that uses a 3-D camera, a belt with separately controllable vibrational motors distributed around it, and an electronically reconfigurable Braille interface to give visually impaired users more information about their environments.

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Strokes may cause increased preference for alcohol, research suggests

Brain changes after stroke may lead to increase in alcohol-seeking behavior, at least in animal models, according to research.

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Cancer therapy shows promise for psoriasis treatment

HDAC inhibitors, already widely used to treat cancer, may be an effective therapy for psoriasis as well, scientists report.

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Innovative approaches to improve personalized radiation therapy for head and neck cancer patients

Researchers are able to use the radiosensitivity index within a mathematical framework to select the optimum radiotherapy dose for each patient based on their individual tumor biology, outlines a new report.

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Researchers closer to cracking neural code of love

Neuroscientists have discovered a key connection between areas of the adult female prairie vole's brain reward system that promotes the emergence of pair bonds. Results from this study could help efforts to improve social abilities in human disorders with impaired social function, such as autism.

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Silk Road Creator Ross Ulbricht Loses His Life Sentence Appeal

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An appellate court puts the final seal on Ulbricht's life sentence, rejecting arguments about corrupt investigators and the injustice of his harsh sentence. The post Silk Road Creator Ross Ulbricht Loses His Life Sentence Appeal appeared first on WIRED.

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Virus infection may be linked to Toledo water crisis, study shows

In August 2014, toxins from algal blooms in Lake Erie shut down the city of Toledo, Ohio's water supply, leaving half a million residents without potable water for more than two days. A new study shows that a virus may have been involved in the crisis and suggests methods for more stringent monitoring of water supplies.

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Virtual reality eases phantom limb pain

Virtual Reality (VR) can relieve the sensation of phantom limb pain, report researchers. A new test shows that VR technology can trick the amputee’s brain into thinking that it is still in control of a missing limb.

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New drug reduces transplant and mortality rates significantly in patients with hepatitis C

Patients with hepatitis C who suffer from advanced stages of liver disease have renewed hope, thanks to findings by researchers who have discovered that a new drug significantly reduces their risk of death and need for transplantation.

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Detecting bloodstains with an antimalarial compound

As seen on crime shows, investigators use a combination of luminol and other substances to light up bloodstains at crime scenes. But now, researchers report that combining luminol with artemisinin, a natural peroxide and antimalarial treatment, reduces the risk of false positives compared to the traditional method.

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Detecting alzheimer's disease before symptoms emerge

Cognitive tests can detect early Alzheimer’s disease in older adults without symptoms according to a new study.

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Ketamine doesn't affect delirium or pain after surgery

A new study sought to discover what effect ketamine has on delirium and pain — two serious postoperative complications.

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Tough, but tender, cancer fighters created in lab

Analogs of anti-tumor agents have been developed as potential drugs that proved highly effective at killing even drug-resistant cancer cell lines.

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Sugar sponges sop up and release glucose as needed

Many diabetes patients must inject themselves with insulin, sometimes several times a day, while others take medications orally to control blood sugar. The injections, as well as the side effects from both regimens, can be painful. Now, one team reports progress toward an insulin-free diabetes treatment that requires fewer injections.

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The Internet Defines ‘Covfefe’

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Early this morning President Trump tweeted a fake word. Social media's reaction is a prime example of how language travels online. The post The Internet Defines 'Covfefe' appeared first on WIRED.

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New insights into mechanisms regulating gene expression in embryonic stem cells

Researchers have discovered new information about the mechanisms which maintain gene activity in human embryonic stem cells. The observed mechanism is essential for the self-renewal of stem cells.

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Women negatively judged if they take maternity leave, and if they don't

Women are judged negatively if they choose to take maternity leave -- and if they don't -- new research suggests.

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How the ‘Orange Empire’ Became the Land of MegaWarehouses

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Traffic and air pollution threaten the town of Moreno Valley, where developers want to build the largest warehouse project anywhere in the country. The post How the 'Orange Empire' Became the Land of MegaWarehouses appeared first on WIRED.

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Personalized cell therapy combination achieves complete remission in CLL patients

Combining the kinase inhibitor ibrutinib with an investigational personalized cellular therapy known as CTL119 can lead to complete remission in patients with high-risk chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), according to new research.

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Reading to therapy dogs improves literacy attitudes in second-grade students

Second-grade students who read aloud to dogs in an afterschool program demonstrated improved attitudes about reading.

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Real-time imaging in mice a promising influenza study tool

Real-time imaging of influenza infection in mice is a promising new method to quickly monitor disease progression and to evaluate whether candidate vaccines and treatments are effective in this animal model, according to scientists. They evaluated the live imaging system as a potential alternative to traditional methods of assessing investigative influenza vaccines and treatment in mice, which can be time consuming and require more study animals for valid statistical comparison.

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Handheld scanner reveals vascularization in psoriasis patients

A newly developed tissue scanner allows looking under the skin of psoriasis patients. This provides clinically relevant information, such as the structure of skin layers and blood vessels, without the need for contrast agents or radiation exposure.

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Peek into your genes: NASA one-year mission investigators identify links to vision problems

Coinciding with May -- Healthy Vision Month, NASA's One-Year Mission investigators are peering into their new findings to help address astronaut vision issues.

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Making glaucoma treatment even easier with sustained release medication

Traditional eye drops, while the go-to medication option for glaucoma patients, still have lots of room for improvement. Dosing regimens can be difficult to manage or remember, irritation or redness can occur, and much of the medication gets blinked away before reaching the eye. Because of these challenges, researchers are working to make taking glaucoma medication easier.

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New technique pinpoints the 'partners in crime' of cancer genes

Batman and Robin. Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson. Fiction is full of dynamic duos that work together to accomplish amazing feats. When one partner is out of commission, the other steps in to make sure the job gets done. But if both are missing in action, the outcome is likely to be dire. Cancers also often rely on pairs of complementary genes to keep their cells plugging along as they spin increasingly out of the bounds of normal cellular control.

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A Pebble-Shaped Gizmo Helps Keep Your Smart Home Secure

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The Dojo provides anti-virus protection for the vulnerable smart devices in your life. The post A Pebble-Shaped Gizmo Helps Keep Your Smart Home Secure appeared first on WIRED.

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The Physics of Ramming an Imperial Star Destroyer, Explained

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This epic scene from Rogue One provides an awesome opportunity to do some physics. The post The Physics of Ramming an Imperial Star Destroyer, Explained appeared first on WIRED.

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Spotting the invisible: Mapping structures, functions of a transient enzyme state

Chemists have succeeded in mapping structures and functions of a transient enzyme state. By modifying the enzyme adenylate kinase, researchers were able to isolate the molecule and study it using the quantitative techniques X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.

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New prostate cancer technology improves biopsy accuracy

New prostate cancer technology is improving the accuracy of biopsies. The technique fuses information from a prostate MRI to ultrasound images taken during the biopsy. The technique results in higher cancer detection, fewer biopsies and more accurate biopsies.

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Small molecule prevents blood clots without increasing bleeding risk

It may be possible to disrupt harmful blood clots in people at risk for heart attack or stroke without increasing their risk of bleeding, according to a new study.

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Modern data suggests midlife-crisis risk of suicide in people’s late 40s

New research documents modern international evidence of a midlife peak in suicide risk. The pattern is particularly marked among females, and within the English-speaking countries. In many nations it also holds for males. Middle-aged people now commit suicide at almost twice the rate of individuals in their 30s or 60s.

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Do obese children need to attend treatment to lose weight?

One-third of American children are overweight or obese. Family-based treatment (FBT) has been considered the best model for the treatment of obese children as it provides both parents and children with education and behavior therapy techniques but is provided mainly in a hospital setting. Researchers have found that parent-based therapy (PBT) has similar outcomes to FBT and could be more cost-effective.

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Researchers listen to zebrafish to understand human hearing loss

Can a fish with a malformed jaw tell us something about hearing loss in mice and humans? The answer is yes, according to a new publication.

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Obesity can lead to more severe hot flashes and other menopause symptoms

Vasomotor symptoms (VMS), such as hot flashes and night sweats, cause serious discomfort in many women at menopause. Studies show a higher frequency of VMS in women who gain weight during the postmenopause period, and the effect of obesity on VMS has been studied for many years. A new study finds that hot flashes are associated with a higher body mass index (BMI).

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The Age of Electric Aviation Is Just 30 Years Away

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Barring a miracle, chemistry takes time to advance. The post The Age of Electric Aviation Is Just 30 Years Away appeared first on WIRED.

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All the Gear We Loved in This Month, From Phones to Drones

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April showers bring May flowers, but May brought us the Microsoft Surface, DJI Spark, Amazon Echo Show, and more. The post All the Gear We Loved in This Month, From Phones to Drones appeared first on WIRED.

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To Make Your Conspiracy Theory Legit, Just Find an ‘Expert’

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Just because someone has a PhD doesn't make the conspiracy theory they're espousing any more real. The post To Make Your Conspiracy Theory Legit, Just Find an 'Expert' appeared first on WIRED.

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Eruptions Says Goodbye to WIRED

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Eruptions' run at WIRED ends, but the blog lives on. The post Eruptions Says Goodbye to WIRED appeared first on WIRED.

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Robots Wielding Water Knives Are the Future of Farming

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If humanity expects to feed its booming population off a static amount of farmland, it's going to need help. The post Robots Wielding Water Knives Are the Future of Farming appeared first on WIRED.

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Uber Fired Its Robocar Guru, But Its Legal Fight With Google Goes On

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Dumping the engineer at the heart of a legal battle with Google's Waymo doesn't indemnify the ridehailing giant. The post Uber Fired Its Robocar Guru, But Its Legal Fight With Google Goes On appeared first on WIRED.

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Don’t Read Too Much Into That Successful Missile Defense Test

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The Pentago successfully tested its interceptor missile defense against an ICBM, but that doesn't mean the US is ready for a strike. The post Don't Read Too Much Into That Successful Missile Defense Test appeared first on WIRED.

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Understanding proteins and their impact on immune system

Researchers have made a breakthrough in the understanding of how our genetic make-up can impact on the activity of the immune system and our ability to fight cancer.

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Intel’s New Processors Are Built For the High-Powered Future of PCs

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The Core i9 has 18 cores, 36 threads, and looks a whole lot like where the PC industry's headed. The post Intel’s New Processors Are Built For the High-Powered Future of PCs appeared first on WIRED.

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New plasmonic sensor improves early cancer detection

A new plasmonic sensor will serve as a reliable early detection of biomarkers for many forms of cancer and eventually other diseases.

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Common antioxidant could slow symptoms of aging in human skin

New work suggests that a common, inexpensive and safe chemical could slow the aging of human skin. The researchers found evidence that the chemical -- an antioxidant called methylene blue -- could slow or reverse several well-known signs of aging when tested in cultured human skin cells and simulated skin tissue.

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Prenatal stress predisposes female mice to binge eating

Stress changes our eating habits, but the mechanism may not be purely psychological, research in mice suggests. A study has found that stressed mouse mothers were more likely to give birth to pups that would go on to exhibit binge-eating-like behavior later in life. The pups from stressed mothers shared epigenetic tags on their DNA, but these markers only made a difference when the researchers put the young offspring into a stressful situation.

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Mosquitoes infected with virus-suppressing bacteria could help control dengue fever

Mosquitoes infected with the bacteria Wolbachia are significantly worse vectors for dengue virus, but how to establish and spread Wolbachia in an urban mosquito population is unclear. A study now demonstrates that over time, strategic releases may be enough for mosquitoes infected with the dengue-suppressing bacteria to spread across large cities.

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Older mothers have higher rates of severe complications in childbirth

The risk of potentially life-threatening morbidity around childbirth, such as renal failure, obstetric shock, and amniotic fluid embolism, increases in older mothers, according to a new study.

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Household chemicals may impair thyroid in young girls

Early childhood exposures to specific phthalates were associated with depressed thyroid function in girls at age 3, according to scientists. Phthalates, a class of chemicals thought to disrupt the endocrine system, are widely used in consumer products from plastic toys to household building materials to shampoos.

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Cigarette damage to unborn children revealed in stem cell study

Chemicals found in cigarette smoke have been shown to damage foetal liver cells. Researchers have now developed a novel way to study the effects of maternal smoking on liver tissue using embryonic stem cells.

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Not such a 'simple' sugar: glucose may help fight cancer and inflammatory disease

Scientists have just discovered that glucose, the most important fuel used in our bodies, also plays a vital role in the immune response. Targeting glucose-controlled systems in the body thus offers an exciting new option for regulating this response.

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Assessing and addressing the impact of childhood trauma

People experiencing psychosis become more prone to experiencing unusual thoughts, beliefs, and experiences that make it harder to distinguish reality. For some people experiencing childhood trauma is linked to psychosis. A recent review offers a model of the trauma-psychosis risk cycle that results from experiencing childhood trauma. In this model early childhood trauma interacts with a child's genetic vulnerability and propels some children toward psychosis.

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New vaccine strategy identified for explosive emerging diseases

A ‘designer’ manganese-peptide antioxidant of the world’s toughest bacterium, combined with radiation, have shown to be successful in the development of a vaccine to counter Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus (VEEV), a biothreat agent, and Chikungunya virus, a mosquito-borne illness causing severe outbreaks around the world, according to a study.

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Opioid abuse following urologic surgery documented

About 1 in 1,111 patients who undergo urologic surgery experience opioid dependence or overdose, a study has found. Patients at highest risk were younger, underwent inpatient surgery, had longer hospital stays, were on Medicaid or Medicare or had a history of depression or COPD.

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Price controls on drugs: Striking the balance between affordability and innovation

With a number of high-profile cases of prescription medication prices suddenly skyrocketing, people naturally start to wonder if perhaps some government control over the price of drugs might be a good idea.

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Diabetes linked to bacteria invading the colon

In humans, developing metabolic disease, particularly type 2 diabetes, is correlated with having bacteria that penetrate the mucus lining of the colon, according to a new study.

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New antibiotic packs a punch against bacterial resistance

Scientists have given new superpowers to a lifesaving antibiotic called vancomycin, an advance that could eliminate the threat of antibiotic-resistant infections for years to come. The researchers discovered a way to structurally modify vancomycin to make an already-powerful version of the antibiotic even more potent.

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Wearing a 'heart' on your sleeve can reduce stress

A heartbeat-like vibration delivered onto the inside of the wrist can make the wearer feel significantly less stressed, suggests new research.

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Tactile feedback adds 'muscle sense' to prosthetic hand

Tactile feedback on the skin allowed blindfolded test subjects to more than double their ability to discern the size of objects grasped with a prosthetic hand, report researchers in a new report.

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One blood pressure drug therapy associated with lower health-care costs

About half of patients diagnosed with high blood pressure will need their medication adjusted within the first year to address side effects or failure to control blood pressure properly. Among the modification options available, one drug therapy is associated with lower costs for follow-up doctor visits and hospitalizations, according to a new study.

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Reservoirs of latent HIV can grow despite effective therapy, study shows

Immune cells infected with a latent form of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are able to proliferate, replenishing the reservoir of virus that is resistant to antiretroviral drug therapy, new research has found.

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Emergency room patients routinely overcharged, study finds

An analysis of billing records for more than 12,000 emergency medicine doctors across the United States shows that charges varied widely, but that on average, adult patients are charged 340 percent more than what Medicare pays for services ranging from suturing a wound to interpreting a head CT scan.

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Understanding T cell activation could lead to new vaccines

Scientists could be one step closer to developing vaccines against viruses such as Zika, West Nile or HIV, according to researchers.

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New hope for multiple cancers with pembrolizumab combination therapies

The combination of pembrolizumab and the checkpoint inhibitor known as epacadostat is leading to promising responses and is generally well tolerated in patients with triple-negative breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, squamous cell cancer of the head and neck, and several other cancers, according to researchers.

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There's more to this exercise program for older adults than bicep curls

Exercise is good for older adults. But what kind is best? The answer to that question is important. It may mean the difference between an older person living independently or having to move into a facility where someone helps them with daily living activities.

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Your sex life is only as old as you feel

The closer you feel to your actual age, the less likely you are to be satisfied with your sex life, a study has found. The study looked at the attitudes of sex and aging of a group of 1,170 adults from their mid-40s to their mid-70s over a 10-year period.

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Does stress lead to lengthier periods of sick leave?

The duration of a person’s unfitness for work is determined by more than his/her primary diagnosis. Patients often report psychological problems and a feeling of being burnt out. Researchers analyzed whether an association exists between such psychological symptoms and the length of sick leave, even if patients received their sick note because of purely physical symptoms, such as back pain.

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Stem cells yield nature's blueprint for body's vasculature

The developmental pathway that gives rise to the different types of cells that make up human vasculature has now been identified by a team of researchers.

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Unexpected presence of glucose receptor in ovarian cancer links metabolism to most aggressive cases

A new study of non-diabetic women with ovarian cancer reveals a potential correlation and area for further study regarding the expression of the GLUT1 glucose transporter receptor at the cancer tissue level. GLUT1 is a receptor protein involved in the absorption of glucose, or sugar, in the bloodstream and across membranes in the body.

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Researchers discover mechanism that controls bone formation, function

A mechanism that controls the formation and function of plate-like nanocrystals that play a critical role in bone composition has now been discovered by researchers.

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Biologics before triple therapy not cost effective for rheumatoid arthritis

Stepping up to biologic therapy when methotrexate monotherapy fails offers minimal incremental benefit over using a combination of drugs known as triple therapy, yet incurs large costs for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA), research concludes.

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The Unflinching, Unfinished Battle Royale That’s Entrancing Gamers

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The unfinished <em>PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds</em>, a 100-player multiplayer survival game, has become a massive, overwhelming hit. The post The Unflinching, Unfinished Battle Royale That's Entrancing Gamers appeared first on WIRED.

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Behold the Giant, Glorious Structures Keeping Nature at Bay

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Photographer Claudius Schulze documents more than 200 dams, seawalls and snow sheds around Europe. The post Behold the Giant, Glorious Structures Keeping Nature at Bay appeared first on WIRED.

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How circadian clocks communicate with each other

Multiple biological clocks control the daily rhythms of physiology and behavior in animals and humans. Whether and how these clocks are connected with each other is still a largely open question. A new study now shows that a central clock governs the circadian rhythms in certain cases.

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Inroads made into finding out how T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia develops

New insights have been gained into the molecular mechanism affecting how genes are produced during normal T-cell development, and contributing to leukemia formation.

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Childhood obesity causes lasting damage to the body

Obesity in childhood has long term health implications stretching into adulthood, a new study reveals.

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High-fat diet alters reward system in rats

Exposure to high-fat diet from childhood may increase the sensitivity of the dopamine system later in adulthood, according to a study in male rats.

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Lawn mower injuries send 13 children to the emergency department every day

While there has been a decrease in the number of children injured by lawn mowers over the last few decades, this cause of serious injury continues to be a concern, new research indicates.

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Mobile technology and child and adolescent development

The use of mobile technology is among children and adolescents is very diverse, research shows. The work points to great complexity in the effects of that usage.

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Why Netflix’s Best New Comedies Are Way Less Binge-Friendly

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<em>Master of None</em> and <em>Dear White People</em> aren't marathons—they're remixable minimovies. The post Why Netflix’s Best New Comedies Are Way Less Binge-Friendly appeared first on WIRED.

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Subduing the rebellion: Unmasking rogue cells in the immune system

Researchers have discovered a target to single out immune system cells responsible for autoimmune diseases such as arthritis or irritable bowel syndrome.

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Rooftop Solar Panels Are Great for the Planet—But Terrible for Firefighters

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New training and fire codes are supposed to make firefighters safer when they run into solar panels, but they're inconsistently applied. The post Rooftop Solar Panels Are Great for the Planet—But Terrible for Firefighters appeared first on WIRED.

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Get Ready for Skyscrapers Made of Wood. (Yes, Wood)

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Wood is architecture's hottest new (old) material. The post Get Ready for Skyscrapers Made of Wood. (Yes, Wood) appeared first on WIRED.

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Who Will Pay for the Future if Not the Robots?

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If robots take over humans' jobs, people will lose their incomes—and governments won't have incomes to tax. The post Who Will Pay for the Future if Not the Robots? appeared first on WIRED.

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One Man’s Quest to Make 20-Year-Old Rum in Just Six Days

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Obsessive distiller Bryan Davis invented a contraption for aging booze—fast. His goal: to create highly engineered spirits unlike any you've tasted before. The post One Man's Quest to Make 20-Year-Old Rum in Just Six Days appeared first on WIRED.

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The Father of Android Is Back, and He’s Built the Anti-iPhone

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Andy Rubin sees the future, and can't sit around waiting for it to arrive. The post The Father of Android Is Back, and He's Built the Anti-iPhone appeared first on WIRED.

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