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Showing posts from June, 2017

The 9 Most-Read WIRED Stories in June

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What do ticks, Apple, and a "Poppy" sensation all have in common? Well, your attention, dear reader.

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Trump's Voter Fraud Commission Wants All Your Data. What Could Go Wrong?

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Trump's commission to investigate voting fraud wants to make all your voter data public. Here is every reason why experts on both sides of the aisle think that's a bad idea.

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Photo of the Week: A Dizzying View of a Bicycle Graveyard in China

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Riders in Hangzhou, China abandon leave public bicycles all over the city. They've got to go somewhere.

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Possible early diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder

Measuring a set of proteins in the blood may enable earlier diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to a study.

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Porsche's 700-Horsepower 2018 911 GT2 RS Is the Most Powerful 911 Ever

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The sports car does 0 to 60 in 2.8 seconds thanks to a revamped biturbo flat-six engine.

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Exposure to cardiovascular risk factors linked with arterial distensibility in adolescence

The longitudinal study on children and adolescents is unique worldwide. The study shows that cardiovascular risk factors, such as overweight, high blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and insulin resistance, are associated with arterial distensibility in adolescence.

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How the liver unclogs itself

Scientists have described the mechanical principles adopted by liver cells as they remove excess bile during obstructive cholestasis.

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Miniature technology, big hope for disease detection

Researchers develop a simple printing method to create effective disease detection tools.

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Liquid biopsies: A non-invasive look at treatment response

A new study shows that so-called "liquid biopsies", blood tests that detect circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA), may not only sound an early alert that a treatment's effect is diminishing, but may also help explain why -sometimes offering clues about what to do next.

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New clues found to common respiratory virus

Scientists have solved the structure of a protein that helps a common respiratory virus evade the immune system. The team has identified critical parts of the protein that could be targeted with drugs or vaccines, opening up the possibility of preventing or treating an infection that sickens thousands of babies and elderly people every year.

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Discovery could influence methods to control bacteria on medical and other surfaces

New research has revealed how bacteria thin the liquid they are swimming through in order to free themselves when trapped by walls or other obstacles. This finding could influence methods to control bacterial growth on medical, industrial, and agricultural surfaces.

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Every Question Donald Trump Asked on Twitter This Month, Answered

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We're here to help.

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Flipping the switch on controlling disease-carrying insects

Authorities in Florida and Brazil recently released thousands of mosquitoes infected with a bacterium called Wolbachia in an effort to curb Zika outbreaks. Find out how Wolbachia neutralizes insects.

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3-D-printed implants can improve integration of amputee prosthetic devices with bone

A new study evaluated two additive manufacturing methods for producing either fine or coarse textured titanium implants and compared the strength of bone integration, interlocking, and torque in rats given one or both types of the implants in the distal femurs.

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5 Shows You Should Definitely Not Binge-Watch This Holiday Weekend

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Four-day weekend! Netflix time! Just because something is streaming online, though, doesn't mean it's suitable for a marathon.

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The Best New Products in June, From the New iPad to Coding Robots

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Plus: Microsoft's Surface Laptop, Monument Valley II, and Dyson's fancy cord-free vacuum.

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Subtle molecular changes along the upper digestive tract could guide cancer therapy

Based on a new molecular study of tissues biopsied from various parts of the upper digestive tract, researchers have identified significant, if subtle, differences in gene mutations and other factors that could help in developing more tailored treatment options for cancer patients.

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Designing Genderless Emoji? It Takes More Than Just Losing the Lipstick

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It took a year and a half for Paul Hunt to cook up Unicode's first gender-inclusive emoji—but now your keyboard is a little less binary.

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Opinion: Climate Change Is Making Cities Sick

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City leaders must do more to integrate climate concerns into public health policy.

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The Beautiful, Impossible Dream of a Simpler Smartphone

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Why is it so hard to build a smartphone that doesn't drive us crazy?

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Elon Musk's Chicago Tunnel Makes a Dumb Idea Even Dumber

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Airport connections to mass transit are tricky to build.

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Vault 7, Shadow Brokers, WannaCry, and Petya Should Put an End to the Encryption Debate

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Any case for intelligence agencies to have special access to encryption moot.

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The Battle to Get Gender Identity Into Your Health Records

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A decade ago, most electronic health care records collected just one piece of gender-related data: sex. Here's how that changed.

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Cancer researchers overestimate reproducibility of preclinical studies

Cancer scientists overestimate the extent to which high-profile preclinical studies can be successfully replicated, new research suggests.

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Do You See Me Now? Psychology, Photography, and the Mobile Age

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The world uploads 1.8 billion photos each day. They all say the same thing: "I am here.

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A perturbed skin microbiome can be 'contagious' and promote inflammation

In a new study, researchers have shown for the first time that, not only can infection with the Leishmania parasite alter the skin microbiome of affected mice, but this altered microbial community can be passed to uninfected mice that share a cage with the infected animals.

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Even perfectly clean hands can lead to MRSA transmission in NICU babies

A new study found that even if hospital workers follow handwashing guidelines as closely as possible, MRSA can still be transmitted among their newborn patients in the NICU.

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With Blue Apron’s IPO, Wall Street Reins in Silicon Valley

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It's a sing of the times.

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Car seat laws for older kids have limited impact

Laws that require increasingly older kids to sit in car safety seats appear to have limited impact, new research has found.

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Novel molecular dynamics captures atomic-level detail of CRISPR-Cas9 activity

For the first time, researchers have discovered the myriad structural changes that activate and drive CRISPR-Cas9, the innovative gene-splicing technology that’s transforming the field of genetic engineering.

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Researchers find link between food allergies and childhood anxiety

Researchers studied the link between food allergy and childhood anxiety and depression among a sample of predominantly low socioeconomic status minority children and found that children with a food allergy had a significantly higher prevalence of childhood anxiety. Food allergies were not associated with symptoms of childhood depression or with symptoms of anxiety or depression among their caregivers.

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Teenage weight gain linked to increased stroke risk as an adult

Kids who become overweight during their teenage years may be more likely to develop a stroke decades later than kids who did not become overweight during those years, according to a study.

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Researchers help develop technique for assessing, reducing risk of future stroke

Using health records, researchers developed an algorithm for scoring the risk of a stroke patient experiencing a heart condition known as atrial fibrillation, a major risk factor for a second stroke.

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Microfluidic chip predicts risk of preterm birth

Preterm birth is the leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Now, researchers have developed a system to capture and identify a scarce blood peptide called P1 that can predict increased risk of preterm birth, offering the opportunity to delay birth or increase fetus viability to save lives and reduce lifelong disabilities.

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Biomechanical acoustics study sheds light on running injuries

Devoted runners suffer from a surprisingly high rate of injury. One reason for these injuries is that runners endure many shocks from the impact, and these cause vibrations that travel from the foot throughout the entire body. A researcher who focuses on acoustics and biomechanics, studied these repetitive shocks and investigated how runners adapt their running patterns.

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Common antimicrobials help patients recover from MRSA abscesses

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria are resistant to multiple antibiotics and commonly cause skin infections that can lead to serious or life-threatening infection in other parts of the body. New research found that two common, inexpensive antimicrobials can help heal MRSA skin abscesses. The findings suggest that current treatment options for MRSA still have a role, even as scientists continue to search for new antimicrobial products.

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Mechanism behind precise spinal cord development found

Scientists have uncovered how nerve cells in the spinal cord are organized in precise patterns during embryo development -- a finding that could give insight into regenerative medicine.

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Does carrying extra weight offer better survival following a stroke?

Despite the fact that obesity increases both the risk for stroke and death, a new study has found that people who are overweight or even mildly obese survive strokes at a higher rate as compared to those with a normal body weight.

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Uber's Scandal Provides a Chance to Remake Silicon Valley

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Opinion: The lesson of Uber is that we get the companies and the economy we ask for.

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Bringing CRISPR into focus

Researchers have generated near-atomic resolution images of key steps in CRISPR-Cas3 function. The findings reveal multiple layers of error detection that prevent unintended genomic damage. Structural understanding informs efforts to improve the accuracy of CRISPR systems for gene editing and to reduce off-target effects.

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Newly identified small RNA fragments defend the genome when it's 'naked'

A scientific research team has discovered might be considered emergency replacements for the epigenetic 'sentries' that normally protect the genome from transposons and viruses. These shock troops are pressed into service across the genome only during curiously undefended moments when early, preimplantation embryos are stripped of epigenetic marks and later reprogrammed. It could be one of the earliest forms of genome defense, created by snipping 18- and 22-nucleotide fragments from tRNAs.

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MIT Research Helps Deploy Flying Cars Safely

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A bit of clever math keeps everybody safe—and sane.

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Children with autism should be checked for DCD, study recommends

Researchers are recommending in a new study that children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder should be checked for developmental coordination disorder since the two maladies are linked.

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New system makes fast, customized antibiotic treatments possible

Using nanotechnology, image processing tools and statistical analysis, researchers have developed a system that enables faster diagnostics, earlier and more effective treatment of infectious bacteria, and improved patient recovery times.

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New antiviral drug inhibits epidemic SARS, MERS and animal coronaviruses

A new antiviral drug candidate inhibits a broad range of coronaviruses, including the SARS and MERS coronaviruses, a multi-institutional team of investigators reports. The findings support further development of the drug candidate for treating and preventing current coronavirus infections and potential future epidemic outbreaks.

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Test identifies breast cancer patients with lowest risk of death

A molecular test can pinpoint which patients will have a very low risk of death from breast cancer even 20 years after diagnosis and tumor removal, according to a new clinical study. As a result, 'ultralow' risk patients could be treated less aggressively and overtreatment avoided, leading to fewer toxic effects.

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Lung cancer screening could save money as well as lives, research shows

Lung cancer screening programs should target high-risk people and identify other tobacco-related conditions, suggests a new report.

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PTSD in children quickly and effectively treatable within hours

Children and adolescents with posttraumatic stress syndrome (PTSD) can be successfully treated with only a few hours of EMDR or cognitive behavioral writing therapy (CBWT), report researchers.

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The gene behind follicular lymphoma

Scientists have discovered an important gene whose loss lies behind follicular lymphoma, an incurable cancer.

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Scientists move closer to defeating 'superbugs' with simplified forms of teixobactin

Scientists have produced new, effective and simplified forms of teixobactin -- a new generation antibiotic which defeats multi-drug resistant infections such as MRSA -- as part of a pioneering research effort to tackle antimicrobial resistance.

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New study examines effectiveness of labor induction in India

Researchers have published a major study of two different types of labur induction methods.

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Treatment benefits patients with thalassaemia and HCV

Many individuals with the blood disorder thalassaemia also carry the hepatitis C virus (HCV) due to contaminated transfusions before 1990. Due to the co-existence of iron overload (from repeated blood transfusions), these patients are at increased risk of developing liver cancer. A new study indicates that treatment with a combination of sofosbuvir and ledipasvir as a once a day single pill leads to a sustained virological response in 98% of patients with thalassaemia and HCV.

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Campylobacter to blame for most foodborne infections in Denmark

Campylobacter is to blame for more than 4,600 foodborne infections in Denmark and is thus still the most common cause of foodborne disease. This is one of the findings of the annual report for 2016 on the incidence of diseases that can be transmitted from animals and food to humans.

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Malaria control in African schools dramatically cuts infection and reduces risk of anemia

Schools that provide prevention education, insecticide-treated nets and antimalarial treatment, in regions where malaria is highly seasonal, could reduce the risk of schoolchildren developing anemia and improve their cognitive performance.

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Twitter's Music-Site Meme War Isn't About Civility, It's About Money

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The social media platform is cracking down on accounts spreading copyrighted materials harder than those spreading hate.

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How air pollution is linked to type 2 diabetes

Researchers examine associations of air pollution.

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Are people 'rolling the dice' when it comes to food safety?

A new study has revealed the levels of bad behaviors in restaurants which increase the public's risk of getting food poisoning.

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Cocoa and chocolate are not just treats -- they are good for your cognition

Researchers have examined the available literature for the effects of acute and chronic administration of cocoa flavanols on different cognitive domains. It turns out that cognitive performance was improved by a daily intake of cocoa flavanols.

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Giant molecular cages made for energy conversion and drug delivery

The porous, 'sponge'-type molecules have an enormous internal surface area. This allows their use as 'molecular flasks' or 'molecular containers' that change the reactivity and properties of encapsulated molecules.

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Rotten Tomatoes is Deciding What Movies You Don't See—Without You Knowing It

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More and more movies are tanking—and sure, they might be bad, but something else may be at play: metadata dependency.

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Banned chemicals pass through umbilical cord from mother to baby, research finds

Trace amounts of flame retardants, banned in the US for more than a decade, are still being passed through umbilical cord blood from mothers to their babies, according to new research. The chemicals are linked to health concerns including hormone disruption and low birth weight.

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Vivobarefoot Ultra Blooms: Earth-Friendly Running Shoes Made of Algae

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These new running shoes are made from algae-based foam. They look like Crocs, but you can run a marathon in them.

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Cadillac Challenges Tesla With the Super Cruise Self-Driving System

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Debuting on the CT6 sedan, Super Cruise watches the driver to solve the ever-tricky "handoff problem."

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Your Connected Devices Are Screwing Up Astronomy

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The radio spectrum is a limited commodity—and more and more of it is getting slurped up by consumer devices.

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iPhone Turns 10: How It Became the Everything Machine

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It was the iPhone that taught people to tap, swipe, and pinch-to-zoom until they unwittingly fell in love.

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The Trump Administration Can’t Stop China From Becoming an AI Superpower

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If America wants to stay ahead, it's not a matter of trying to slow China down.

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Inside Nike Breaking2, the Epic Quest for the Perfect Marathon new messages

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Nike's quest to break the two-hour marathon did not go as planned. But when you're pushing the limits of human performance, nothing ever does.

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A new weapon for the war on cancer

Scientists have adapted an engineered human blood opsonin protein known as FcMBL, which was originally developed as a broad-spectrum pathogen capture agent, to target circulating tumor cells -- the notoriously rare and difficult-to-locate agents of metastasis. Using magnetic beads coated with FcMBL, they were able to capture >90 percent of seven different types of cancer cells, demonstrating that the approach could be valuable in cancer diagnostics and monitoring.

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Paving the way for promising treatment for hot flashes

Fifteen years ago, Dr. Naomi Rance was at work when she experienced her first hot flash. Rance, a physician and researcher, took note. As it turns out, her basic scientific research on estrogen's involvement with hot flashes may lead to a promising treatment for them.

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Adolescent obesity linked to early mortality from cardiovascular diseases

While there is solid evidence that adolescent overweight and obesity are associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke, less is known about the association between body mass index (BMI) and rarer cardiovascular diseases.

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Inflammatory bowel disease: Scientists zoom in on genetic culprits

Scientists have closed in on specific genes responsible for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) from a list of over 600 genes that were suspects for the disease. The team produced a high resolution map to investigate which genetic variants have a causal role in the disease.

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Analysis of Neanderthal teeth grooves uncovers evidence of prehistoric dentistry

A discovery of multiple toothpick grooves on teeth and signs of other manipulations by a Neanderthal of 130,000 years ago are evidence of a kind of prehistoric dentistry, according to a new study researcher.

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Why Victims of Facebook Harassment Will Never Leave Facebook

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When network effects mean social monopoly.

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DHS Won't Extend Laptop Ban, But Its New Protocols Will Make Airport Security Extra Annoying

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Expect more pat downs and closer inspection of your gadgets on flights into and out of the United States.

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Scientists identify cause, possible treatment for life-threatening gut condition

Investigators have discovered a genetic cause and potential treatment strategy for a rare immune disorder called CHAPLE disease. Children with the condition can experience severe gastrointestinal distress and deep vein blood clots. No effective treatments are available to ameliorate or prevent these life-threatening symptoms.

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What's on your skin? Archaea, that's what

It turns out your skin is crawling with single-celled microorganisms -- and they're not just bacteria. A study has found that the skin microbiome also contains archaea, a type of extreme-loving microbe, and that the amount of it varies with age.

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How family and friends influence breast cancer treatment decisions

When a woman walks into the oncologist's office, she's usually not alone. In fact, a new study finds that half of women have at least three people standing behind them, sitting next to them or waiting at home to help.

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Instagram Unleashes an AI System to Blast Away Nasty Comments

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The social media site wants to turn itself into the friendliest place on the internet.

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Study of US seniors strengthens link between air pollution and premature death

A new study of 60 million Americans -- about 97 percent of people age 65 and older in the United States -- shows that long-term exposure to airborne fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone increases the risk of premature death, even when that exposure is at levels below the National Ambient Air Quality Standards.

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WikiLeaks Dump Reveals a Creepy CIA Location-Tracking Trick

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By hacking into computers and tracking the Wi-Fi networks nearby, the CIA could pinpoint Windows PCs around the world.

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Reiner_Riedler_Lifesaving_Machines

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CT technology shows how blood flow can predict effectiveness of ovarian cancer treatment

Technology can provide a new window into whether or not patients are responding to treatment for advanced ovarian cancer. A multi-center clinical trial has demonstrated that CT Perfusion, which measures blood flow and blood volume to tumors associated with ovarian cancer, can provide an accurate prediction of how well a treatment is working, allowing physicians the opportunity to better plan treatment.

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Mildly obese fare better after major heart attack

People who survive a major heart attack often do better in the years afterward if they're mildly obese, a study by cardiologists shows.

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Concurrent hot and dry summers more common in future

In the past, climate scientists have tended to underestimate the risk of a co-occurrence of heatwave and drought. This is the conclusion of one of the first studies to examine compound climate extremes.

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How are long strands of DNA packed into tiny cells?

Scientists are a step closer to understanding how our DNA is squeezed into every cell in the body. They provide the first-ever detailed picture of the nucleosome, the most basic building block of chromosomes (the structures that house our DNA). This finding will inform research on all processes that involve chromosomes, such as gene expression and DNA repair, which are critical to the understanding of diseases such as cancer.

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Ancient antiviral defense system could revolutionize a new class of RNA-based medicine

Medicinal payload could be delivered by engineered RNAs that can be controlled by a billion year-old 'genetic fossil' found in all cells, say investigators.

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Editor's Note: Unicorn-Making Machines

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Behind the scenes of Backchannel's incubator week.

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Combating chronic kidney disease with exercise

A research team is combating chronic kidney disease (CKD) with exercise. The team had patients engage in a specially designed exercise program and found that it improved their blood vessel health and exercise capacity.

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No, Donald Trump Isn't Calling For an Internet Tax

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Reading too much into vague tweets (or anything, really) won't get you very far.

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Heart attack shown to be 'systemic condition'

An acute heart attack should not be viewed in isolation – myocardial infarction is a "systemic" condition with an impact upon the whole body and engenders responses in other organs, such as liver and spleen, a new study concludes.

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First 'haploid' human stem cells could change the face of medical research

Stem cell research holds huge potential for medicine and human health. In particular, human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), with their ability to turn into any cell in the human body, are essential to the future prevention and treatment of disease.

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Sleep disturbances predict increased risk for suicidal symptoms, study finds

Sleep disturbances can warn of worsening suicidal thoughts in young adults, independent of the severity of an individual's depression, a study has found.

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This Cell Phone Can Make Calls Even Without a Battery

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University of Washington researchers have made a phone that draws what little power it needs from thin air.

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Consensus recommendations on isotretinoin and timing of skin procedures

A new article reports on a panel of national experts that was convened and a review of the medical literature that was done to provide evidence-based recommendations regarding the safety of skin procedures performed either concurrently with, or immediately after, treatment with the acne medication isotretinoin.

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No detectable limit to how long people can live

By analyzing the lifespan of the longest-living individuals from the USA, the UK, France and Japan for each year since 1968, investigators found no evidence for such a limit, and if such a maximum exists, it has yet to be reached or identified.

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Understanding early melanoma metastasis and developing new targets for treatment

A new study allows to visualize 'in vivo' how melanomas act before metastasis occurs, and how these invasive signals are reactivated when surgery is not efficient. The researchers have also identified new metastasis mechanisms induced by very small lesions in the skin, which represent new progression biomarkers and potential targets for melanoma treatment.

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Does symmetry matter for speed? Study finds Usain Bolt may have asymmetrical running gait

World champion sprinter Usain Bolt may have an asymmetrical running gait, say researchers, throwing into question whether symmetry matters for speed. Using a 'two-mass' model for assessing patterns of ground-force application suggests Bolt's right and left legs may perform differently, defying scientific assumptions that asymmetry hinders performance. Unexpected and potentially significant asymmetry in the fastest human runner ever would help scientists better understand the basis of maximal running speeds.

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Swimming microbots can remove pathogenic bacteria from water

The lack of clean water in many areas around the world is a persistent, major public health problem. One day, tiny robots could help address this issue by zooming around contaminated water and cleaning up disease-causing bacteria, report scientists.

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Gecko-Inspired Gripper May Soon Snag Space Junk

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It could not only help robots get a good grip on things like space debris, but supercharge robots right here on Earth.

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Potentially lethal parasite rat lungworm found throughout Florida

Researchers have found rat lungworm, a parasitic nematode that can cause meningitis in humans and animals, in five Florida counties.

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Petya Ransomware Could Hide State-Sponsored Attacks, Say Ukrainian Analysts

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Analysis shows Petya looks more like a targeted, state-sponsored attack than just ransomware.

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When Russell Westbrook Won NBA MVP, Humanity Outpaced Science

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Through sheer will and indefatigability, the point guard became more than the NBA's MVP—he became a metaphor for hope.

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Study examines use of fat grafting for postmastectomy breast reconstruction

The use of fat grafting as a tool for breast reconstruction following a mastectomy may improve breast satisfaction, psychosocial well-being, and sexual well-being in patients, according to a study.

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Discovering, counting, cataloguing proteins

Scientists describe a well-defined mitochondrial proteome in baker's yeast, in a newly published report.

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Genetic tests help identify relative risk of 25 cancer-associated mutations

Researchers assigned levels of risk to 25 mutations associated with breast and ovarian cancer in a large, Stanford-led study. The results may be helpful in guiding treatment and screening recommendations.

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Protein associated with Parkinson's disease linked to human upper GI tract infections

Acute and chronic infections in a person's upper gastrointestinal tract appear to be linked to Parkinson's disease, say scientists.

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With health care cuts looming, low-cost magnesium a welcome option for treating depression

The cost of depression is great -- 350 million people worldwide suffer from this disorder and costs for traditional SSRI treatments are high. New clinical research results show magnesium is effective at addressing symptoms and is safer and easier on the wallet than prescription therapies.

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Eviation's Alice Commuter Is an Electric Plane for Wealthy Commuters

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The battery-powered "private jet" could be in service by 2021.

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Microneedle patch developed for flu vaccination

An influenza vaccine can produce robust immune responses and be administered safely with an experimental patch of dissolving microneedles, shows new research. The method is an alternative to needle-and-syringe immunization; with further development, it could eliminate the discomfort of an injection as well as the inconvenience and expense of visiting a flu clinic.

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Study illuminates serotonin contributions to cocaine's allure

A new study reinforces long-held suspicions that the brain chemical serotonin, a molecule usually associated with mood, appetite and libido, makes a direct contribution to the actions of cocaine. Scientists can now clearly see details of how the brain uses serotonin not just to regulate mood, but also to drive both rapid and long-lasting changes in the brain. They suspect these changes may contribute to the brain modifications that ultimately trap users in an addicted state.

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Indoor air in schools could add to children's exposure to PCBs

The US banned PCBs nearly four decades ago, but they persist in the environment and have been found in animals and humans since then. Now researchers report that concentrations of airborne PCBs inside schools could result in some students inhaling the compounds at higher levels than they would consume through their diets. Exposure through both are lower than set limits, but cumulative amounts, researchers caution, could be concerning.

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New gene editing technique could drive out mosquito-borne disease

Scientists have demonstrated a way to edit the genome of disease-carrying mosquitoes that brings us closer to suppressing them on a continental scale.

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Proteins linked to HIV transmission could actually be beneficial for reproduction

Protein fragments found in semen, and previously only known for their ability to enhance HIV infection, also appear to play an important role in reproductive biology. A team of researchers discovered that these fragments could help dispose of damaged or unneeded sperm.

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At-risk chronic pain patients taper opioids successfully with psychological tools

Psychological support and new coping skills are helping patients at high risk of developing chronic pain and long-term, high-dose opioid use taper their opioids.

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New technology aims to provide peace and positive stimulation to dementia patients

To alleviate boredom and increase engagement, elderly patients in long-term care facilities can engage with the Ambient Activity Technology device any time to view family photos, hear their favorite music, and play games.

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Genomic copy number variants contribute to cognitive impairment in the UK

Genetic alterations of rare deletions or duplications of small DNA segments, called copy number variants (CNVs), have been known to increase risk of neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorder, and intellectual disability. Now, a new study reports that even in the absence of a disorder, people carrying a CNV associated with these disorders may have impaired cognition.

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'Matrix' inside tissues and tumors

Scientists have developed a groundbreaking method to reveal the structure of tissues and tumors with unprecedented detail, by completely dissolving away cells and leaving the delicate extracellular matrix intact.

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Male infertility could be linked to noisy bedrooms

Long-term exposure to a noisy environment, particularly at night, is linked to infertility in men. The researchers found that exposure above the WHO night noise level (55 dB -- equivalent to the noise of a suburban street) is linked to a significant increase in infertility.

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Cystic fibrosis alters the structure of mucus in airways

Cystic fibrosis (CF) alters the structure of mucus produced in airway passages. In pigs affected by CF, mucus strands (made of MUC5B protein) are more tangled than normal, and the sheets of mucus (made of MUC5AC protein) that cover the strands are denser. These structural abnormalities may help explain why people with CF have difficulty clearing mucus from their lungs.

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Brain signals deliver first targeted treatment for world's most common movement disorder

Researchers have delivered targeted treatment for essential tremor -- the world's most common neurological movement disorder -- by decoding brain signals to sense when patients limbs are shaking.

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Pentagon ‘Space Corps’ Plan Leaves Earth Science in the Dust

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Scientists and the military have often tussled when it comes to who is more important in outer space.

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Remains of early, permananet human settlement in Andes discovered

Examining human remains and other archaeological evidence from a site at nearly 12,500 feet above sea level in Peru, the scientists show that intrepid hunter-gatherers -- men, women and children -- managed to survive at high elevation before the advent of agriculture, in spite of lack of oxygen, frigid temperatures and exposure to elements.

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Injectable plant-based nanoparticles delay tumor progression

Researchers discovered injecting potato virus particles into melanoma tumor sites activates an anti-tumor immune system response. And simultaneously injecting the nanoscale plant virus particles and a chemotherapy drug--doxorubicin--into tumor sites further helps halt tumor progression in mice.

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Unique stem cells as a potential asthma treatment

A new therapy developed through stem cell technology holds promise as a treatment for chronic asthma.

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